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Table 1 Participant characteristics

From: Talking about treatment benefits, harms, and what matters to patients in radiation oncology: an observational study

   Oncologists (n = 11) Nurses (n = 14) Residents (n = 4) Patients (n = 40)
Age Mean (SD) 42 (9) 44 (13) 28 (2) 64 (9)
Sex Male: N (%) 6 (55%) 0 (0%) 1 (25%) 22 (55%)
  Female: N (%) 5 (45%) 14 (100%) 3 (75%) 18 (45%)
Visible minority (Note 1) N (%) 0 (%) 0 (%) 0 (%) 2 (5%)
Has a disability N (%) 0 (%) 0 (%) 0 (%) 5 (13%)
Years in practice Mean (SD) 10 (8) 22 (14) 5 (1)
Preferred decision-making style Clinician-led: N (%) 2 (18%) 0 (0%) 0 (0%) 8 (21%)
  Shared: N (%) 4 (36%) 0 (0%) 2 (50%) 8 (21%)
  Patient-led: N (%) 5 (45%) 13 (93%) 2 (50%) 22 (56%)
  Did not answer: N (%) 0 (0%) 1 (7%) 0 (0%) 2 (5%)
Numeracy (scale 8–48) Median (IQR) 40 (8) 37 (6) 42 (2) 35 (14)
Literacy (scale 3–18) Median (IQR) 13 (4)
Education No postsecondary degree: N (%) 22 (55%)
  Postsecondary degree: N (%) 17 (42.5%)
  Did not answer: N (%) 1 (2.5%)
Type of Cancer Breast: N (%) 6 (15%)
  Prostate: N (%) 6 (15%)
  Lung: N (%) 5 (13%)
  Stomach, Rectal or Oesophagus: N (%) 4 (10%)
  Lymphoma: N (%) 4 (10%)
  Central Nervous System (CNS): N (%) 2 (5%)
  Head and Neck: N (%) 2 (5%)
  Melanoma: N (%) 1 (3%)
  Palliative care (various cancer types): N (%) 10 (25%)
  1. (Note 1) Visible minority is a common Canadian term for self-reporting as a person of color. Quebec City’s population is very homogeneous, with most people being white francophones. SD Standard Deviation, IQR Interquartile Range